March 29, 2008

A Whole Lot Of Anger


Obama's Anger


"The anger is real. It is powerful, and to simply wish it away, to condemn it without understanding its roots, only serves to widen the chasm of misunderstanding that exists between the races."
- Barack Obama


Back in the late 1980s I was on a plane flying out of New Orleans and sitting next to me was a rather interesting and, according to Barack Obama, unusual black man. Friendly, gregarious, and wise beyond his years, we immediately hit it off. I had been working on Vietnamese commercial fishing boats for a few years based in southern Louisiana. The boats were owned by the recent wave of Vietnamese refugees who flooded into the familiar tropical environment after the war. Floating in calm seas out in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico, I would hear tearful songs and tales from ex-paratroopers about losing brothers, sisters, parents, children, lovers, and beautiful Vietnam itself to the communists.

In Bayou country I lived on boats and in doublewide trailers, and like the rest of the Vietnamese refugees, I shopped at Wal-Mart and ate a lot of rice. When they arrived in Louisiana the refugees had no money (the money that they had was used to bribe their way out of Vietnam and into refugee camps in Thailand), few friends, and a mostly unfriendly and suspicious local population.

They did however have strong families, a strong work ethic, and the "Audacity of Hope." Within a generation, with little or no knowledge of English, the Vietnamese had achieved dominance in the fishing industry there and their children were already achieving the top SAT scores in the state.

While I had been fishing my new black friend had been working as a prison psychologist in Missouri, and he was pursuing a higher degree in psychology. He was interested in my story, and after about an hour getting to know each other I asked him point blank why these Vietnamese refugees, with no money, friends, or knowledge of the language could be, within a generation, so successful. I also asked him why it was so difficult to convince young black men to abandon the streets and take advantage of the same kinds of opportunities that the Vietnamese had recently embraced.

His answer, only a few words, not only floored me but became sort of a razor that has allowed me ever since to slice through all of the rhetoric regarding race relations that Democrats shovel our way during election season:
"We're owed and they aren't."

In short, he concluded, "they're hungry and we think we're owed. It's crushing us, and as long as we think we're owed we're going nowhere.

"A good test case for this theory is Katrina. Obama, Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton and assorted white apologists continue to express anger and outrage over the federal response to the Katrina disaster. But where were the Vietnamese "leaders" expressing their "anger?" The Vietnamese comprise a substantial part of the New Orleans population, and yet are absent was any report claiming that the Vietnamese were "owed" anything. This is not to say that the federal response was an adequate one, but we need to take this as a sign that maybe the problem has very little to do with racism and a lot to with a mindset.

The mindset that one is "owed" something in life has not only affected black mobility in business but black mobility in education as well. Remember Ward Churchill? About fifteen years ago he was my boss. After leaving the fishing boats, I attended graduate school at the University of Colorado at Boulder. I managed to get a job on campus teaching expository writing to minority students who had been accepted provisionally into the university on an affirmative action program. And although I never met him, Ward Churchill, in addition to teaching in the ethnic studies department, helped to develop and organize the minority writing program.

The job paid most of my bills, but what I witnessed there was absolutely horrifying. The students were encouraged to write essays attacking the white establishment from every conceivable angle and in addition to defend affirmative action and other government programs. Of the hundreds of papers that I read, there was not one original contribution to the problem of black mobility that strayed from the party line.

The irony of it all however is that the "white establishment" managed to get them into the college and pay their entire tuition. Instead of being encouraged to study international affairs, classical or modern languages, philosophy or art, most of these students became ethnic studies or sociology majors because it allowed them to remain in disciplines whose orientation justified their existence at the university. In short, it became a vicious cycle.

There was a student there I'll never forget. He was plucked out of the projects in Denver and given a free ride to the university. One day in my office he told me that his mother had said the following to him: "M.J., they owe you this. White people at that university owe you this." M.J.'s experience at the university was a glorious fulfillment of his mother's angst.

There were black student organizations and other clubs that "facilitated" the minority student's experience on the majority white and "racist" campus, in addition to a plethora of faculty members, both white and black, who encouraged the same animus toward the white establishment. While adding to their own bona fides as part of the trendy Left, these "facilitators" supplied M.J. with everything he needed to quench his and his mother's anger, but nothing in the way of advice about how to succeed in college. No one, in short, had told M.J. that he needed to study. But since he was "owed" everything, why put out any effort on his own?

In a fit of despair after failing most of his classes, M.J. wandered into my office one Friday afternoon in the middle of the semester and asked if I could help him out. I asked M.J. about his plans that evening, and he told me that he usually attended parties on Friday and Saturday nights. I told him that if he agreed to meet me in front of the university library at 6:00pm I would buy him dinner. At 6pm M.J. showed up, and for the next twenty minutes we wandered silently through the stacks, lounges, and study areas of the library. When we arrived back at the entrance I asked M.J. if he noticed anything interesting. As we headed up the hill to a popular burger joint, M.J. turned to me and said:

"They were all Asian. Everyone in there was Asian, and it was Friday night."

Nothing I could do, say, or show him, however, could match the fire power of his support system favoring anger. I was sad to hear of M.J. dropping out of school the following semester.

During my time teaching in the writing program, I watched Asians get transformed via leftist doublespeak from "minorities" to "model minorities" to "they're not minorities" in precise rhythm to their fortunes in business and education. Asians were "minorities" when they were struggling in this country, but they became "model minorities" when they achieved success. Keep in mind "model minority" did not mean what most of us think it means, i.e., something to emulate. "Model minority" meant that Asians had certain cultural advantages, such as a strong family tradition and a culture of scholarship that the black community lacked.

To suggest that intact families and a philosophy of self-reliance could be the ticket to success would have undermined the entire angst establishment. Because of this it was improper to use Asian success as a model. The contortions the left exercised in order to defend this ridiculous thesis helped to pave the way for the elimination of Asians altogether from the status of "minority."

This whole process took only a few years.

Eric Hoffer said:
"...you do not win the weak by sharing your wealth with them; it will but infect them with greed and resentment. You can win the weak only by sharing your pride, hope or hatred with them."

We now know that Barack Obama really has no interest in the "audacity of hope." With his race speech, Obama became a peddler of angst, resentment and despair. Too bad he doesn't direct that angst at the liberal establishment that has sold black people a bill of goods since the 1960s. What Obama seems angry about is America itself and what it stands for; the same America that has provided fabulous opportunities for what my black friend called "hungry" minorities. Strong families, self-reliance, and a spirit of entrepreneurship should be held up as ideals for all races to emulate.

In the end, we should be very suspicious about Obama's anger and the recent frothings of his close friend Reverend Wright.

Says Eric Hoffer:
The fact seems to be that we are least open to precise knowledge concerning the things we are most vehement about. Vehemence is the expression of a blind effort to support and uphold something that can never stand on its own.

A personal note:

While living in Alabama, we became friends with a black lady who attended some of the same church meetings that we attended. I won't mention her name, for obvious reasons, but she was a sweet lady in her late sixties, or early seventies. She had dinner at our home, and we at hers, and we attended various functions together. Over time, she shared some of her background, and her experiences with us. She said that when she was a young woman, that she hated all white people, and actually carried a butcher's knife on her person, and she said that she would have used it on a white person without a second thought.

She had worked as a housekeeper/nanny for white families, and what she told us was shocking! She said that when the parents left the house, that she would mistreat the children, putting them into the bathtub and making them stay for hours, while she did whatever she wanted to do. She said that when she cooked the meals that she would spit into the food, and that she did that the whole time she cooked for them, but they never knew it. I asked her why she did that, were they unkind, or did they mistreat her in any way. She said no, they just loved her, and were good to her. Then why? "Because they were white, and I hated all white people." Of course, she said, she changed when she found God, and started going to church, and no longer hated white people, but still didn't trust most of them.

She has two daughters, both living in Chicago, and one is married to a white man. She has many, many neices and nephews, all of whom have a college degree of some kind, with high paying jobs. I commended her on this, saying that not a single member of my family, nor of my relatives, had attended college, the reason being that none of them were financially able to do it.

She said that all of them had been given scholarships, or grants, and that was the reason that they could attend college. I asked her how they all got scholarships like that, expecting the answer to be that they were over-achievers, and deserving of it, but her answer really shocked me. She said that they got it because they were "entitled to it." That white society owed it to them because of the way their people had been held back. The odd thing is, that she answered in all sincerity the thing that she believed. I was surprised, because I was rather naive about such things at the time. I had no idea that many blacks really did have that mindset. I had had another similar experience a few years ago while applying for a job, but I thought that it was not something that happened all the time. Now, I know how wrong I was.

I think that Mr. Kaitz's essay explains a lot about what has brought us to where we are now.

16 comments:

The Hermit said...

That's an excellent posting and addresses an issue that not many people have the courage to face outright.

There is a segment of the black population that relishes their status as "victims" because it places the responsibility for their own failures on other people. It also allows them to absorb a large percentage of the resources devoted to the American "social safety net." As long as they are content to sit back with their hands out and their noses in the air, they will continue to be the parasites they are.

Stephen said...

Parasites and leaches sums it up quite well.

Jan said...

Hermit..this is true, unfortunately, and I doubt that it will change much in the future, either.

Jan said...

Stephen..thanks for dropping by! :)

Mrs. K's Lemonade Stand said...

Those who believe they are "owed" will always remain weak because they never experience the strength that hard work and ambition instills in those that believe they must pave their way.
Good post Jan!

GUYK said...

Many years ago a philosopher turned stand up comedian named Brother Dave Gardner quipped, " when you see a poor man down...KICK HIM! Give him the incentive to get up."

When I first heard that I was not only poor but I was young and failed to see the humor nor the logic. But over the years I remember what Brother Dave had said..and found that he is right.

Sharing wealth with those who have no intentions of ever earning wealth themselves only serves to make everyone poor.

Jan said...

mrs.k..thanks!

Many will never find out, either, because they like things status quo.

Jan said...

guyk..kind of makes everyone resentful, too, having to give what you've earned to those who won't lift a hand to help themselves.

Richard said...

Wrote Kaitz:
"With his race speech, Obama became a peddler of angst, resentment and despair..... What Obama seems angry about is America itself and what it stands for; the same America that has provided fabulous opportunities for what my black friend called "hungry" minorities."

Mr. Kaitz spins a great story and goes to great lengths in his essay so that he can [out of the blue] make the above declaration that Sen. Obama is a peddler of resentment and that the Senator is angry at what is at the very core of America. Anyone who has ever listened to Sen.Obama with an open heart would never see or hear a hint of resentment or anger coming from the man. If the Senator had either of those poisons in his heart for America he would not be subjecting himself to the brutal grind of running for President. Who among you would bust your butt for more than a year and a half; and subject your family to the cruelest rumors and constant accusations of critics all for a country that you really just can't stand? Not me. Kaitz would have you believe that that is exactly what the Senator is doing. I can't help but question Kaitz' motives.
And yes, some recipients of gov't help have worked the system. Maybe if funding was made available for case workers and compliance officers, something more could be done about the deadbeats.

Jan said...

'Maybe if funding was made available for case workers and compliance officers, something more could be done about the deadbeats.'

Richard..are you serious? I think you are missing the point, entirely! This is not just about deadbeats..it is about so many things, which obviously you are refusing to see--or believe!


The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.
John F. Kennendy ~1963

Maggie's Notebook said...

Jan, I linked to you in my post today. I use haloscan and am not sure how to let you know this without a trackback.

Anyway, this piece by Kaitz and your personal note, raise an important question: for how many generations do we "owe" Black America?

Thanks for a great piece.

Maggie

Jan said...

Maggie..thanks for the link, it is much appreciated.

For how many generations do we owe Black America?

Well, if Obama has his way, it will be for generations past, and on into perpetuity, probably.

Cdogg said...

richard said: "Who among you would bust your butt for more than a year and a half; and subject your family to the cruelest rumors and constant accusations of critics all for a country that you really just can't stand?"

obviously he is hoping to gain position to maneuver changes upon the naive (you) and the rest of us. it has been pointed out his close relationship with his america-bashing pastor and to assume he listens to those crazy rants for 20 years and doesnt believe or follow is downright pathetic. mr kaitz did tell a great story and all he did was provide further reiterations of husseins contempt for this country.
and as for the victimization of the black community? its a shame. its a shame because the majority are bringing the good americans down with them. its a shame because hussein agrees and publically berates his caucasian grandmother to further this cause...
im afraid of where we are heading as a nation. im afraid for my son.
cdogg

Cdogg said...

p.s. i came from a link on maggies notebook. great article!
cdogg

Jan said...

cdogg..I understand what you are saying about being afraid for your son.

I think we, as a nation, are facing something unlike anything we've known before.

Thanks for your comment..and thanks for dropping by.

Jan said...

cdogg..I understand what you are saying about being afraid for your son.

I think we, as a nation, are facing something unlike anything we've known before.

Thanks for your comment..and thanks for dropping by.